Save The Frogs’ Day celebrated in Kumasi, Ghana!

Happy Save The Frog’s Day!

Yesterday thousands of people gathered in their local communities in over 30 countries around the world to celebrate amphibians and bring awareness to their conservation!

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana organized educational Save The Frog’s Day events across Ghana, with a goal of raising amphibian awareness and specifically to reduce the frog meat trade, and to increase support of our efforts to create the Atewa Hills National Park. Yesterday over 150 people attended the Save The Frog’s Day event in Kumasi, Ghana!

Save The Frogs Day, Ghana, Africa, Environmental Education, Amphibian Conservation

This event was organized by the SAVE THE FROGS! Chapter at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology (KNUST). The day started off with educational presentations about local issues in the environment, including the need to restore the Wee Wee River and how to effectively protect the critically endangered Togo Slippery Frog, Conraua derooi.

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Executive Director Gilbert Adum discussed amphibian conservation efforts in Ghana and how SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana has become a model for amphibian conservation in West Africa.

Save The Frogs Day, Ghana, Africa, Environmental Education, Amphibian Conservation

SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana Program Coordinator Sandra Owusu-Gyamfi spoke about how women can help save the frogs in their local communities.

Save The Frogs Day, Ghana, Africa, Environmental Education, Amphibian Conservation

After the presentation, the Executive Leaders of KNUST Chapter of SAVE THE FROGS! Ghana handed over their positions to the next generation of dedicated frog savers at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology.

Save The Frogs Day, Ghana, Africa, Environmental Education, Amphibian Conservation

Happy Save The Frogs’ Day from Kumasi, Ghana!

Save The Frogs Day, Ghana, Africa, Environmental Education, Amphibian Conservation

See what Save The Frogs’ Day events happened in your part of the world!

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Another event successfully completed. Phew. I’ve been incredibly busy since I arrived to Ghana and right before STF! Day in Kumasi I decided I needed a break (if you read our latest newsletter, you’d understand why) . So off I went to Lake Bosumtwi to mellow out and find some peace in nature.

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, fishing, over-harvesting, deforestation, climate change

Lake hoooooooooooo!

The lake was created from the impact of a meteorite and it is the only natural lake in Ghana. However accordingly to locals the lake was formed from a hunter shooting an antelope. Wait. What? Ok, so apparently the antelope didn’t die and it wandered off into forest. The hunter followed the antelope and he saw that where it stopped to rest… this puddle formed and swallowed up the antelope. Then somehow the lake was created. So, that may not be the entire story but it is pretty close. The name Bosumtwi means “Antelope God”. Apparently the antelope was a god and that is why the lake was created when the hunter shot it. All I know is that locals think the lake is sacred and every kid and his brother wants to tell you the “history” of the lake for a small fee.

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, fishing, over-harvesting, deforestation, climate change

I was told it takes 8 hours to walk around the lake and if I wanted to get in a boat to go across the lake then it would be very expensive. As I am on a tight budget, I avoided the boat ride. I did learn that around the lake are 29 different communities and they depend on the lake for their survival. To survive they subsistence farm the surrounding forest and they fish.

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, fishing, over-harvesting, deforestation, climate change

These are the famous boats of Lake Bosumtwi. As the lake  is considered sacred, villagers do not allow metal to touch the lake so the men use these wooden planks in order to fish. Imagine casting nets off a surfboard… that’s pretty much what it is like. Like many areas of Africa, deforestation is a serious problem in this area. They villagers are cutting down the trees faster than they can grow and the impact has been devastating. The result is that the lake is drying up. Long story short, less trees means less water retention in the environment and increased surface area. The water in the lake is slowly evaporating away. So it goes.

Has anyone noticed the incredible lack of frogs in each post?

Normally I would be posting many, many photos of frogs (normally that is ALL I post). However:
1. It is not the best time to find frogs in Ghana… still the dry season here.
2. I have had little time to go out and search for frogs!

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, fishing, over-harvesting, deforestation, climate change

At the lake I was determined to find some frogs! Along the lake there are shallow depressions that fill with water and aquatic vegetation. I found many tadpoles and about 3 or 4 species of frogs. Unfortunately frogs are hard to photograph during the day and I was unable to see any up close.

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, frogs, wildlife, nature

This Tiger Frog evaded my attempts at macro photography. Yeah. You’re safe… for now…

After some frog watching it became apparent that it was time to head indoors.

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, fishing, over-harvesting, deforestation, climate change

Rain came and made walking around the lake sub-optimal. So, weather got you down, what are you going to do with your time?

 Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, beer, beach

Typical Starkey Fashion… have a beer.

I decided to wait out the rain, grab some food, and enjoy a nice, cold beer. I was soon joined by a few guests. These crows are everywhere and they are quite beautiful.

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, crow, birds, widlife

Then this adorable invasive species, I mean cat, came by the table and started begging its little brains out. Hard to refuse a million little mews. My friend offered her some food to which it heartily consumed.

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, cat, kitty, feral animal, invasive species

I had fun photographing her :3

Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, Kumasi, cat, kitty, feral animal, invasive species

That’s all for now! Within in the next few days I will finally get to go out into some real rainforest! Updates soon.

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Like my posts? Then consider contributing to my amphibian conservation efforts in Ghana! www.crowdrise.com/savethefrogsghana

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